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Posts Tagged ‘blizzard’

Three years ago, ten years ago

Ric shoveling

While Nome has experienced a relatively warm winter this year – with widespread melting and relatively little snow to speak of – winter in our region is, as you might expect, often the opposite. Here are two examples. In 2011, only three years ago, our snow cover – and our exposure to heavy winter storms…

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In the wind

You’ll often find KNOM’s dedicated news team – including volunteers Eva DeLappe and Margaret DeMaioribus, pictured – reporting on location in Nome, despite our region’s often-inclement weather. Last month, however, the news was the weather. As Margaret reported, a shifting wind pattern called Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) has been at least partly to blame for…

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April 1998: Fighting a spring blizzard

April 24, 1998 The last week of the month brings multiple days of a rip-roaring blizzard to Nome, and KNOMers run outside every hour to clear the station’s satellite dish of snow, which blocks signals. In the dead of winter, snow does not cause this problem, as it is too dry to stick to the antennas.

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April 1999: A stormy Easter

April 4 (Easter Sunday), 1999 The weather is fine for Easter egg hunting today, but at nightfall, a blizzard suddenly kicks up. The wind blows so hard at KNOM’s transmitter site that it holds the shutters for the exhaust fan closed. By the time Les Brown and volunteer Michael Warren make it to the building…

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Snow, sled dogs, and therapy

From swirling snow and whiteout blizzards to clearing skies and rapid temperature drops, the winter weather in Western Alaska changes quickly, creating many challenges for traveling and, at times, for survival. KNOM broadcasts hourly weather information to enhance and save lives. This week, the 1,000-mile 2013 Iditarod Sled Dog Race finishes in Nome. KNOM is broadcasting trail…

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January 2000: Blizzard!

January 16, 2000 A blizzard packing hurricane-force winds drops power lines at the KNOM transmitter site. The station’s emergency generator keeps it on the air for 16 hours before electricity is restored.

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November 1970: Waiting for the weather for tower construction

November 22, 1970 After three weeks of blizzards and winds, the weather has briefly cleared. Volunteers John Pfeifer and Tom Busch are belted to the AM tower at the 95-foot level, and eight others on the ground hoist the microwave receive antenna, which the pair install.  Weather closes in again, and work can’t resume for…

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Halloween, 1970: The AM tower is complete

October 31, 1970 The AM tower construction is complete. Nome Joint Utilities runs a power line across the tundra to the tower, and it is lighted. It’s finished just in time. Two days later, blizzards shut down Nome for almost three weeks.

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