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History

This is What it Means to Say Barrow, Alaska

Volunteer producer Dayneé changes hats, reporting on the Nalukataq celebration in Barrow, Alaska: “I am not a newsie at heart. I compensated for it by giving myself more prep time and a few pep talks in front of the mirror that went something like, ‘You’re assertive! You ask questions! You can walk up to strangers and ask coherent, intelligent questions!'”

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Summer Cleaning

Daynee and the rest of the current volunteers go through years of cherished “hand-me-downs,” treasures passed down from generation to generation of KNOM volunteers. Well, treasures or trash?

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October ’71: The loss of Br. Huck

October 8, 1971 Traveling by small boat from the village of Pilot Station to St. Mary’s, 33-year-old Br. John Huck, SJ, and three others drown when their boat capsizes near the confluence of the Yukon and Andreafsky Rivers. Huck, who directed construction on the studio building, had become a great friend to the KNOM crew,…

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October ’92: A superlative fall storm

October 5, 1992 The worst storm in eighteen years strikes Nome as a low-pressure center swells up a storm surge eight feet above normal with ten-foot waves above that. Covered with flotsam and jetsam, Front Street – Nome’s main thoroughfare – is underwater, and where it runs along the beach, half of it is gone.…

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September ’70: Preparing the transmitter tower site

September 24, 1970 Volunteers John Pfeifer and Tom Busch continue to pound sizzling chisels into the permafrost for explosives expert Sam Tucker to pack with dynamite. They shovel and bucket out debris 11 to 12 hours a day, taking only 10 minutes for lunch and dinner; the meals are delivered to them seven days a…

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September ’05: A “once in a hundred years” storm, again

September 22, 2005 For the second year in a row, Nome is hit by a “once in a hundred years” storm. The town loses power, and KNOM’s transmitter site generator keeps the station on the air for 134 hours until electricity is restored. General manager Ric Schmidt, on the East Coast to accept a Gabriel…

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September ’01: Broadcasting on 9/11

September 11, 2001 Starting at 6 AM, KNOM airs 68 hours of live continuous news coverage on the terrible incidents of today, interrupted only three times: for weather, important messages, and the Rosary.

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September ’72: Construction

September 4, 1972 They’re completed. Fred Dyen and fellow volunteers Les Brown and Chris Brockway have constructed a prefabricated garage and building for the transmitter site generator. Dyen’s friend Jerry Springer had flown up from Spokane to install the generators and transfer switches, and by this week, both studio and transmitter are protected against power outages.

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