96.1 FM | 780 AM | Yours for Western Alaska

In Photos: Mitch Seavey’s Final Miles on the Iditarod Trail

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon.

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon. Photo: David Dodman, KNOM.

Mitch Seavey made Iditarod history on Tuesday afternoon, shattering the race speed record and winning his third championship as the race’s oldest victor, breaking his own record from 2013. His finish also set the stage for a storied afternoon of accomplished mushers’ arrivals under the Burled Arch.

The photos below show, in chronological order, the elder Seavey’s progress from the outskirts of Nome (the areas sometimes called Fort Davis and “Farley’s Camp”) to the finish line on Front Street.

All photos: David Dodman, KNOM.

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon.

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon. Photo: David Dodman, KNOM.

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon.

Iditarod 2017 champion Mitch Seavey mushes on the outskirts of Nome on Tuesday afternoon.

On the Bering Sea ice, Mitch Seavey mushes past Nome race fans.

On the Bering Sea ice, Mitch Seavey mushes past Nome race fans.

Mitch Seavey's team on the Bering Sea ice

The last several miles of the Iditarod take mushers over the frozen ice and snow of the Bering Sea adjacent to Nome.

Mitch Seavey's team on the Bering Sea ice

Mitch Seavey on the Bering Sea ice.

Mitch Seavey arrives at the Nome finish line, the Burled Arch.

Mitch Seavey arrives at the Nome finish line, the Burled Arch. Photo: David Dodman, KNOM

Detail of the Iditarod finish line in Nome, called the Burled Arch. Text reads “End of Iditarod,” etched in wood.

Detail of the Iditarod finish line in Nome, called the Burled Arch.

2 Responses to “In Photos: Mitch Seavey’s Final Miles on the Iditarod Trail”

  1. Paul Korchin

    Another year of award-worthy race coverage: well done, KNOM Krew!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Like What You're Reading?

Whether it's daily news stories or posts from our volunteers on life in the sub-Arctic, our online content is made possible through the support of people like you.

KNOM is supported almost entirely through private giving.

Donate Today

Like What You're Reading?